Global Warming

General Mills: climate change will be bad for business – announces big carbon reductions

logo_generalmills_lg_682_355_c1Fresh Energy applauds General Mills for its decision to cut carbon emissions by 28 percent in the next decade in order to combat global warming. The Minnesota-based company announced its strategy to reduce emissions throughout the value chain, from farm to fork to landfill earlier this morning.  CEO Ken Powell noted, “We think that human-caused greenhouse gas causes climate change…and that it’s going to stress the agricultural supply chain.” He continued, “Obviously we depend on that for our business, and we all depend on that for the food we eat.”

General Mills will invest more than $100 million worldwide in energy efficiency and clean energy in its own facilities.

General Mills in July announced strong support for the Clean Power Plan, the new U.S. regulation that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions from electric power plants by 32 percent from 2005 levels. “General Mills is committed to doing our part to tackle climate change and we fully support the effective implementation of the Clean Power Plan,” said Jerry Lynch, Chief Sustainability Officer of General Mills.  “In particular, we applaud the efforts of our home state of Minnesota for the progress its energy officials are making in building a plan that will work cost-effectively for the families, farmers, municipalities and the business community alike.”

CEO Ken Powell astutely noted that “Climate change is a shared, global challenge that is best addressed at scale.” General Mills made its announcement, pointedly, well in advance of the December 2015 global climate negotiations convened by the United Nations. Science Policy Director J. Drake Hamilton be at the UN conference, representing Fresh Energy in showcasing the Minnesota benefits of the Clean Power Plan, and working with Minnesota businesses that are working toward climate action at scale.

 

Fresh Energy applauds General Mills for its decision to cut carbon emissions by 28 percent in the next decade in order to combat global warming. The Minnesota-based company announced its strategy to reduce emissions throughout the value chain, from farm to fork to landfill earlier this morning.

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