Issues

Transportation & Land Use

Complete Streets mean more jobs

Investment in bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure is not only better for congestion, air quality, public health, and neighborhoods – compared to investing in pavement for cars – it’s better for the economy, too.

A new study from the University of Massachusetts says that bike and pedestrian investments create more jobs than road building alone.

UMass’s Political Economy Research Institute studied 58 separate transportation infrasturcture projects from departments of transportation and public works departments serving 11 cities in the United States. The analysis relied upon an input-output model to estimate the direct, indirect and induced employment from design, construction and materials procurement of various transportation projects.

Cycling projects created 11.4 jobs for every $1 million invested. Pedestrian-only projects create an average of 10 jobs per $1 million, about the same as multi-use trails. Road-only spending of $1 million created the fewest jobs (7.8) within the state.

Lester Shen at Minnesota Center for Energy and Environment (@lshen) caught my eye with this Fast Company story on Twitter, and the always-useful Streetsblog picked it up yesterday as well.

Investment in bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure is not only better for congestion, air quality, public health, and neighborhoods - compared to investing in pavement for cars - it's better for the economy, too.

Leave a comment